Seneca Highlands Intermediate Unit Nine

 

Program Title: HEAVY EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE TECHNOLOGY

CIP CODE 47.0302

Career Cluster Transportation, Distribution & Logistics

Program Length:    Three Year program in a half-day format (1,040 Hrs.)
 

Student Enrollment : This program is offered to any interested students in the Austin, Cameron County, Coudersport, Port Allegany, Otto-Eldred, Oswayo Valley, Northern Potter, Galeton and Smethport School Districts. Students typically enroll while in the 10th, 11th and 12th grades. Learning accomodations are provided. See your Guidance Department for more details.

 

NOTE:   Some elements of the program are offered to adults through evening classes and the Potter County Education Council.

 

Instructor: Joseph A. Naylor –  jnaylor@iu9.org
 
 

Abilities for Success:   Good mechanical aptitude, manual dexterity, hand-eye coordination, reading comprehension, basic math and communication skills, attention to details, organization skills, and the willingness to work in an unclean environment.

 

 

Program Mission Statement:

The mission of the Heavy Equipment Maintenance Technology program is to promote the career opportunities of all participating students and to support the development of the nation’s workforce.

 

Program Goals:

·         All Heavy Equipment Maintenance Technology students will demonstrate proficiency on the Pennsylvania System of Schools Assessment (PSSA) and the 3046 National Occupational Competency Testing Institute (NOCTI) examinations.

·         All Heavy Equipment Maintenance Technology students will receive industry certifications in at least one of the following areas: Pennsylvania State Vehicle Safety Inspection Category I or III (PSSI), Safety and Pollution Prevention (SP/2), PEC Basic Safeland/Safegulf Orientation (SafeLand), or EPA 609 Motor Vehicle Refrigeration EPA-609.

·         All Heavy Equipment Maintenance Technology students will demonstrate sufficient knowledge and proficiency in core competency areas through hands-on performance and written tests.

·         All Heavy Equipment Maintenance Technology students will successfully transition into a career job and/or a related post-secondary training program.
 
Picture of students at work:
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                                        career

 

                 VIDEO- Bus and Truck Mechanic and Diesel Technician 
 
 
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                                         myskills      
 
 
 
                    VIDEO- Mobile Heavy Equipment Technician
 
 
 
 
Nature of the Work: About this section
Heavy vehicles and equipment are indispensable to many industrial activities, from construction to railroad transportation. Various types of equipment move materials, till land, lift beams, and dig earth to pave the way for development and production. Heavy vehicle and mobile equipment service technicians and mechanics repair and maintain engines and hydraulic, transmission, and electrical systems for this equipment. Farm machinery, cranes, bulldozers, and railcars are all examples of heavy vehicles that require such service.
 
Service technicians perform routine maintenance checks on agricultural, industrial, construction, and rail equipment. They service fuel, brake, and transmission systems to ensure peak performance, safety, and longevity of the equipment. Maintenance checks and comments from equipment operators usually alert technicians to problems. After locating the problem, these technicians rely on their training and experience to use the best possible technique to solve it. (For information on service technicians specializing in diesel engines, see the section on diesel service technicians and mechanics elsewhere in the Handbook.)
 
Citation: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2010-11 Edition, DieselService Technicians and Mechanics, on the Internet at http://www.bls.gov/oco/ocos182.htm (visited October 26, 2010).
 
 

Explore Related Occupations:

47-2073.00

Operating Engineers and Other Construction Equipment Operators

49-3051.00

Motorboat Mechanics

49-3041.00

Farm Equipment Mechanics

49-3053.00

Outdoor Power Equipment and Other Small Engine Mechanics

49-3031.00

Bus and Truck Mechanics and Diesel Engine Specialists

49-9043.00

Maintenance Workers, Machinery

 

Program Description:
 

This program is designed to provide students with the technical knowledge and job-related skills necessary for the maintenance and repair of heavy-duty equipment such as trucks, trailers, bulldozers, loaders, tractors, excavators, hydraulic attachments, compressors and the gasoline or diesel engines that power them. Instruction includes shop safety, tool use and the inspection, diagnostic and maintenance procedures for brakes, undercarriages, operating controls, pneumatic and hydraulic systems, electrical circuitry, engines and power trains. Instruction also includes a variety of techniques of arc welding and oxygen acetylene cutting. Students receive training for both Pennsylvania State Safety Inspection Certification training and Safety and Pollution Prevention Training. The use of technical/service manuals and organized work practices are also highly stressed. Safety Glasses, coveralls and work shoes are required shop attire.

 

The vast majority of instruction is present in multiple medians and in small groups. Students are encouraged to work both independently and in small groups to practice and complete a wide variety of activities, tasks and assignments.  Most units of instruction include both written and hands-on forms of assessments.
 

The program is organized and paced so that vast majority of its curriculum can be completed in the first two years.  Students that develop the necessary technical competencies and work-related skills, in this time frame, will have further opportunities to expand their knowledge with trade related personal projects, instructor appointed community projects and the Capstone program. The Capstone program provides students with an opportunity to receive training working on the job as well as receiving pay.

 
The course and curriculum have been developed in conjunction with a local Heavy Equipment Occupational Advisory committee.
 
 

Core Competencies:

Throughout the course of training, the student should be able to:

·         Demonstrate an ability to work safely in a repair shop.

·         Demonstrate knowledge of the fundamentals of operation of all equipment systems.

·         Demonstrate an ability to use a variety of trade resources.

·         Demonstrate an ability to perform scheduled maintenance and service procedures on heavy equipment.

·         Demonstrate an ability to perform common repairs on heavy equipment.

·         Demonstrate an ability to diagnose heavy equipment system symptoms.

·         Use an oxy/acet cutting torch to accurately cut steel.

·         Demonstrate ability to arc-weld mild steel with butt, tee, lap and groove joints, in the flat position.

·         Receive a skills certificate from the NOCTI Exam.

·         Receive an S/P-2 Certification in both the Mechanical Safety and Heavy-Duty Fleet Safety areas.

·         Demonstrate an ability to report work problems and progress on regular basis.

·         Develop the attitude and employability skills required by industry.

 

Heavy vehicle and mobile equipment service technicians and mechanics held about 190,700 jobs in 2008. Approximately 136,300 were mobile heavy equipment mechanics, 31,200 were farm equipment mechanics, and 23,100 were railcar repairers.
About 29 percent were employed by machinery, equipment, and supplies merchant wholesalers. About 13 percent worked in construction, primarily for specialty trade contractors and highway, street, and bridge construction companies; another 11 percent were employed by Federal, State, and local governments. Other service technicians worked in mining; rail transportation; and commercial and industrial machinery and equipment rental, leasing, and repair. A small number repaired equipment for machinery and railroad rolling stock manufacturers. About 6 percent of service technicians were self-employed.
Nearly every area of the country employs heavy and mobile equipment service technicians and mechanics, although most work in towns and cities where equipment dealers, equipment rental and leasing companies, and construction companies have repair facilities.
Job Outlook: About this section
The number of heavy vehicle and mobile equipment service technicians and mechanics is expected to grow about as fast as the average for all occupations. Those who have completed postsecondary training programs should find excellent opportunities, as employers report difficulty finding candidates with this training to fill available positions. Those without a formal background in diesel engine or heavy vehicle repair will face competition.
Employment projections: Employment of heavy vehicle and mobile equipment service technicians and mechanics is expected to grow by 8 percent through the year 2018, about as fast as the average for all occupations. Demand will be driven primarily by growth in the use of heavy equipment in the construction industry, although growth will be slower in this industry than in recent years. In addition, the increasing sophistication of the technology used in heavy vehicles and mechanics should lead to greater demand for technicians and mechanics with specialized skills.
Growth in other industries that use heavy equipment, such as energy exploration and mining, will also contribute to the need for new workers. The need to feed a growing population, and the increased use of agriculture products to make biofuels, will lead to additional farm mechanic jobs, while the continued expansion of railways for freight shipping and transportation will lead to new openings for railcar repairers. Many new mobile heavy equipment and farm equipment mechanic positions are expected be in firms that sell, rent, or lease such machines, as their repair services make up an important part of their business. Employment of mobile heavy equipment mechanics is expected to grow by 9 percent from 2008-18, while jobs for farm equipment mechanics and rail car repairers are expected to increase by 7 percent.
Job prospects: Opportunities for heavy vehicle and mobile equipment service technicians and mechanics should be excellent for those who have completed formal training programs in diesel or heavy equipment mechanics. Employers report difficulty finding candidates with formal postsecondary training to fill available service technician positions. People without formal training are expected to encounter growing difficulty entering these jobs. Most job openings for mobile, rail, and farm equipment technicians will arise from the need to replace experienced repairers who retire or change occupations.
Construction and mining operations, which use large numbers of heavy vehicles and mobile equipment, are particularly sensitive to changes in the level of economic activity. While the increased use of such equipment increases the need for periodic service and repair, heavy and mobile equipment may be idle during downturns. As a result, opportunities for service technicians who work on construction and mining equipment may fluctuate with the cyclical nature of these industries. In addition, opportunities for farm equipment mechanics are seasonal and are best in warmer months.
Projections Data: About this section

Projections data from the National Employment Matrix

Occupational Title

SOC Code

Employment, 2008

Projected
Employment, 2018

Change,
2008-18

Detailed Statistics

 

Number

Percent

 

Heavy vehicle and mobile equipment service technicians and mechanics

49-3040

190,700

206,100

15,500

8

[PDF]

[XLS]

 

Farm equipment mechanics

49-3041

31,200

33,400

2,100

7

[PDF]

[XLS]

 

Mobile heavy equipment mechanics, except engines

49-3042

136,300

148,100

11,800

9

[PDF]

[XLS]

 

Rail car repairers

49-3043

23,100

24,600

1,500

7

[PDF]

[XLS]

 

    NOTE: Data in this table are rounded. See the discussion of the employment projections table in the Handbook introductory chapter on Occupational Information Included in the Handbook.

 

 
Closely Related Occupations: About this section
Diesel service technicians and mechanics held about 263,100 jobs in 2008. These workers were employed in almost every industry, particularly those that use trucks, buses, and equipment to haul, deliver, and transport materials, goods, and people. The largest employer, the truck transportation industry, employed about 17 percent of diesel service technicians and mechanics. About 8 percent were employed by automotive repair and maintenance facilities. The rest were employed throughout the economy, including construction, manufacturing, retail and wholesale trade, and automotive leasing. About 6 percent were self-employed. Nearly every area of the country employs diesel service technicians and mechanics, although most work is found in towns and cities where trucking companies, bus lines, and other fleet owners have large operations.
 
Job Outlook: About this section
The number of jobs for diesel service technicians and mechanics is projected to grow slower than the average for all occupations. Opportunities should be very good for people who complete formal training in diesel mechanics; applicants without formal training will face competition for jobs.
 
Employment change: Employment of diesel service technicians and mechanics is expected to grow by 6 percent from 2008 to 2018, slower than the average for all occupations. The diesel engine, because of its durability and fuel efficiency, is the preferred engine for heavy-duty trucks, buses, and other large vehicles. As more freight is shipped across the country, additional trucks, and corresponding truck repairers, will be needed. Despite this trend, the increasing durability of new vehicles will limit the need for additional workers. Most new jobs will continue to be in the freight trucking and automotive repair and maintenance industries. Beyond the growth in the number of vehicles that need to be serviced, there will be additional demand for diesel engines mechanics to retrofit and modernize existing vehicles to comply with environmental regulations.
 
Due to higher fuel efficiency requirements for automakers, diesel engines are expected to be used in a small but increasing number of cars and light trucks. This will create additional jobs for diesel service technicians, specifically in the automotive repair and maintenance and automobile dealer industries.
 
Job prospects: People who enter diesel engine repair will find favorable opportunities, especially as the need to replace workers who retire increases over the next decade. Opportunities should be very good for people with strong technical skills and who complete formal training in diesel mechanics at community colleges or vocational schools. Applicants without formal training will face competition for jobs.
 
Projections Data: About this section

Projections data from the National Employment Matrix

Occupational Title

SOC Code

Employment, 2008

Projected
Employment, 2018

Change,
2008-18

Detailed Statistics

 

Number

Percent

 

Bus and truck mechanics and diesel engine specialists

49-3031

263,100

278,000

14,900

6

[PDF]

[XLS]

 

    NOTE: Data in this table are rounded. See the discussion of the employment projections table in the Handbook introductory chapter on Occupational Information Included in the Handbook.

 

 

 

 

Suggested citation: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2010-11 Edition, Diesel Service Technicians and Mechanics, on the Internet at http://www.bls.gov/oco/ocos182.htm (visited October 26, 2010).

 

To reserve your spot in the Heavy Equipment Maintenance program, see your guidance counselor today!
OR, for more information, contact Seneca Highlands Area Vocational School Director, James Young at 642-2573.
 
 
 
Career and Job opportunities related to this field can be found at http://www.pacareers.com/jobsearch/
 

Post-Secondary School Options:

A high percentage of heavy equipment mechanic employers require some level of post-secondary education in the field area.  Below is a list of post-secondary schools that graduating heavy equipment students have attended. I should note that currently the Heavy Equipment program does not have any formal articulation or dual enrollment agreements with any of these post-secondary schools; however, most of these schools do offer interested students opportunities to take advance placements tests for admission.

·        Pennsylvania College of Technology

·        Ohio Technical College - OTC

·        Alfred State

·        Nashville Auto-Diesel College - NADC

·        Universal Technical Institute - UTI

·        University of Northwestern Ohio - UNOH

 

 

Some of Our Supporting Local Businesses:

·        GPM

·        Postlewait Logging

·        Gustin’s Auto & Truck Service

·        McKeirnan C L Bus Garage

·        Culver’s Bus Garage

·        McKeirnan Dump Truck Service
·        Appalachian Transport

·        Olson & Tenglund Auto/Truck Parts

·        Cummins Engine Company (Jamestown, NY)